Monthly Archives: September 2010

“One in Eight Million” series wins an Emmy

screen_shot_2010_09_30_at_82216_am.png

The superb series of audio slideshows profiling the lives of ordinary New Yorkers, called “One in Eight Million” won an Emmy in the category of “new approaches to  news and documentary programming.”

If you haven’t checked out this series, photographed by talented NY Times staffer Todd Heisler, and produced by other staff members from the Times, you’re in for a treat.

It is simple, powerful multimedia storytelling at its best: no bells and whistles, fancy graphics, or celebrity subjects. Just the subject’s voice telling his or her story running under Heisler’s evocative black and white photography.

For about a year, Heisler profiled one New Yorker a week, and I have to confess, I used to wait in anticipation for the next biography, so well done are these pieces and so unique and fascinating the subjects.

Heisler has moved on to other projects, but the series is still up and will provide a lot of inspiration for anyone who wants to tell stories with their photographs…. 

 

 

 

You Look Different, Did You Change Your Lack of Hair?

wtd226_0.gif

Well, I’ve gotten more than a few emails asking me “what’s up with the new look of the blog, and what’s with all the unrelated and out of order posts?”

I would have given you guys a heads up that I was throwing my hat in with the folks at Pixiq in an effort to be able to continue spending as much time blogging as I have been without having to moonlight as a cab driver to pay for bandwidth and food, but the “porting” of the blog happened while I was in Africa and a little ahead of schedule. 

We’re giving this a try as the new home of the blog. It works out better for me, and I think, once you get used to the new look, that you’ll find a lot more information from a ton of great sources here. 

As for the excerpts of my book that are getting posted, not to worry, that’ll wind down. The Pixiq folks were concerned that in my absence in West Africa, there wouldn’t be enough fresh content coming in.  So you’re getting some nice swaths of my last book….free! Yes, I may have changed the gear in my bag since that book was written, but most of the other info is evergreen.

I’ve got the blogroll of my links back up, and true, you can’t jump directly to my listings of seminars and workshops (we’re working on that), but, er, not a lot of folks did that at the old blogsite, so I figured it’s no great loss:-).

I’m still learning the new template, and I expect that there’ll be some gaffed posts until I figure it out (software genius that I am). But hang in there and you’ll get the same Photo Traveler bullsh…,er, I mean, wisdom you’ve been used to.

 

 

Talking Travel Photography

I had the chance to sit down and chat with fellow travel photographer Rosanne Pennella about a wide range of issues affecting traveling photographers and Nikon got it all on tape.

We chatted about how we plan for an assignment, how to overcome security and language barriers, when to go to favorite places, and a whole range of other topics.

You can see the video here on Nikon’s site.

Dr. Krist, you’re needed in the O.R., stat!

© Bob Krist---The night the lights went out in Senegal!

Wow, what a trip Senegal is!  Incredible place but tough on docs and patients using the less-than-ideal infrastructure. Take the above photo for instance.

My friend Dr. Al Ruenes and his colleague, Dr. Serigne Gueye, were doing a fistula repair on a patient in a remote clinic south of Dakar when the power went out. So they’ve got the patient opened but can’t see a thing.

Well, as much as I love my Nikon Speedlights, it was continuous lighting that saved the day because I pulled out my little headlamp flashlight and my Lite Panels Micro Pro LED on camera video light, handed them to the docs, and they were able to finish the operation with a nice main light and a broader fill!

The docs liked the light quality so much, they continued to use it even when the lights came back on (probably a good thing, since we lost power a couple of times that day!)

© Bob Krist---The fill is a little close to the main light, but for surgery, this is perfect lighting!

We’re wrapping up here today and hope to be home tomorrow. It’s been an incredible experience seeing what obstacles are faced and overcome here on a daily basis. Hope to have some video up (but, it’s going to take a while).

I hardly shot a still while I was here….video took up all my concentration, and I’m still making rookie mistakes. I’ll have more on that in another post.

A One-Man, Video-Shootin’, Senegalese Band

Photo by Arun Paul. Left to Right: Painter, Doctor, and....Videographer????????

I’m off to Senegal to shoot a short documentary on the volunteer work of my friend Dr. Al Ruenes. Al is a urologist who regularly visits Senegal to teach new techniques to surgeons from all over Africa, and while he’s there, does a whole slew of pro bono procedures for Senegalese patients.

Also coming is renowned plein air artist Bob Beck. He’s going to make paintings of the trip, I’m going to make the short video, and when we get back, we’re going to try to use this stuff to raise money for an operating theater Al hopes to fund in Dakar.

Originally, my son Brian was coming along to do the video duties, and I was just doing stills and audio. But then, young Brian had to go and get a great new gig as an associate producer for a new series at Discovery Channel and couldn’t get the time off.

(Oh sure, let a little thing like a major career move get in the way of a trip with the old man….sheesh, these kids!)

So it’s up to me to do my one-man band routine.

I’m only mildly panicked, as I’ve spent a lot of the summer studying up, shooting a lot of video to try to get my chops somewhat up to snuff.  Even at that, I’ve got a long way to go as a videographer, but I’m ready as I’ll ever be by tonight, anyway!

And just like in my still shooting,  I’ve been researching and finding the smallest, most reasonably-priced stuff that will do the job right.

So it’s going to be a little quiet on the blog for the rest of the month. And comment moderation could be very slow, so if you post a comment and it doesn’t show up for a while, it is nothing more nefarious than a bad or non-existent internet connection in my location!

For a look at the gear I’ll be bringing on this one man band gig, hit the jump. Continue reading »